1. The Gates of Horn and Ivory are Closing!
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Discussion in 'Archipelago' started by umaeril, Nov 14, 2003.


The Gates of Horn and Ivory

Two Gates the silent House of Sleep adorn; Of polish'd Iv'ry this, that of transparent Horn:
True Visions thro' transparent Horn arise; Thro' polish'd Iv'ry pass deluding Lies.

  1. 21007

    21007 Guest

    Re: .

    <blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>I mean, look what happened to the bible.<hr></blockquote>

    Hmm.. what DID happen to the bible?
     
  2. Re: .

    That would be originally in Spanish? (The poem that is?)
     
  3. The Gov

    The Gov Guest

    Re: .

    He lived and worked in Portugal; it's probably Portuguese.

    As I travel to work on New Year's Day, I don't think I've ever seen so many people at Flinders Street Station on a Sunday morning before. The platform is covered with black footprints and it's so sticky that it says 'platch' when I step on it. It looks as if people have waded through mud and alcohol to be here. There's a man on a bench near the State Library with his head between his knees, vomiting gouts of water; and a group of middle-aged men in shorts accompanied by a woman whose little breasts sit on her round tummy like two pugs on a cushion. A few people are staring at a busker and his cattle dog on the corner of Bourke Street. He's taught the dog to bark on cue when he plays "How Much Is That Doggie In The Window?" Then there are younger people in black pants and white shirts who are obviously on their way to work, like me; they're asking one another how much sleep they got last night. "Not enough."
     
  4. Re: .

    I am amazed how much noise there is from the road as well... cars going by and people out already! Wow.
     
  5. umaeril

    umaeril Guest

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    Nice piece of writing there!
     
  6. Re: .

    Agreed.
     
  7. TWT

    TWT Guest

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    Mrs. Gov, I'm curious, what would be your opinion on Pitchforkmedia.com?
     
  8. The Gov

    The Gov Guest

    Re: .

    I like 'em. I mean, I'm not as fascinated by indie trivia as they are, so I don't read everything on the site, but there's usually something there that interests me whenever I drop by.
     
  9. The Gov

    The Gov Guest

    Re: .

    Bushfires are burning somewhere off to the west of us and the Australian Open is on. The papers are reporting both. On one hand, we've got Venus Williams suffering defeat - or it might be her sister, I have no idea - and on the other hand we've got houses burnt down. It's odd, the thought of both things happening so close together. You could flee your fire-ravaged home in a car and drive to the tennis, or flee the boring tennis and drive to the fire. The losing players could be ceremonially immolated along with the koalas and possums.
     
  10. umaeril

    umaeril Guest

    Re: .

    Wow, those are some fires. Too bad about that. But you are right, the juxtaposition of those two topics is strange. It was also strange looking at that news site. The news is just so different it seems.
     
  11. The Gov

    The Gov Guest

    Re: .

    Why, which news site do you usually visit? We have two local papers here, The Age and the Herald-Sun - though the H-S is not much more than a tabloid.
     
  12. umaeril

    umaeril Guest

    Re: .

    I usually hit the BBC news and also CNN.
     
  13. The Gov

    The Gov Guest

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    That would definitely explain the difference in news.

    In the papers today: still the bushfires, still the Aussie Open. Fifty-six reinforcement firefighters arrived this morning on a ship from Tassie while the tennis has been taken over by Marcos Baghdatis, a Cypriot with a flecky black beard and a huge grin. He came from nowhere and now he keeps winning things. He's also, apparently, been hanging out at a souvlaki place called Stalactites where we sometimes pick up dinner when we're in the city.

    An ice-cream truck is playing its tune somewhere nearby. The old man across the road must have died or gone into a home because they've put a skip in front of his house and filled it to the brim with bits of rubbish: carpets, things that look like broken laminated furniture. There's a shirtless middle-aged man out there now, washing a small yellow hatchback in the old man's driveway. He's taken a piece of blue plastic out of the car boot and now he's straightening it. Now he's put it on the concrete. Now he's wiping down the inside of the passenger door. He's really giving that car a thorough clean.

    M. reversed our car into the skip when they first put it out there and now the chassis at the back is dented in a way that might make the boot leak next time it rains. Still, things might be worse. We could be dead. Or in a home. Or whatever's happened to that man.

    Australia Day yesterday. Parade. Fireworks. I worked, and missed it.
     
  14. Re: .

    At first I was surprised to see that the news there is so sensationalistic. It's as bad as Yahoo news. But then again I remember reading Danish news, and that was pretty bad too, so I guess it really is a worldwide phenomenon after all.

    I couldn't picture a Cypriot who wasn't named Marcos with a flecky black beard and huge grin.

    The boot is the aft storage compartment that americans call a trunk?
     
  15. The Gov

    The Gov Guest

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    It is.
     
  16. umaeril

    umaeril Guest

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    Ah Gov, I love reading what you write, it's very detailed. Let's see if I can do it. Josef is standing in front of me, staring at the tv set. It's our brand new 37" plasma screen tv that we have been ogling all night long. Now Josef has gone into the kitchen, but I can see him because the wall is cut open to make a counter there. He was heating up something in the microwave and now he is stirring it. "What are you making?" I ask, "just some warm milk and brandy and decaf coffee thing" he replies. I die. :xx "What are you typing" he asks and I start to laugh.
     
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    I am sitting at my computer in my front room. The sofa is to my right and to my left is the TV. Behind me is a book shelve and some posters. Music is playing - Pet Shop Boys "Heart", changing to "Miracles".
     
  18. The Gov

    The Gov Guest

    Re: .

    Mm ...

    Well, I've just stopped cleaning my nails so that I could write this. There were tiny bits of chopped-up mint still trapped under them because, last night at work, I ate reheated lamb chops with my fingers for dinner. They were leftovers from the night before, when I ate at home. The difference between American lamb chops and Australian lamb chops (as far as I can tell, having tried eating lamb while I was over there) is that the American cuts tend to be thin, with a long, curved bone and a circle of meat at the top, like lollypops, while the lamb I've eaten here is cut like a slab of meat, and you can tear chunks off it. Some cuts come with a cross-section of bone planted in them, a little round target filled with marrow. That used to be my favourite part of the lamb when I was little - I'd suck the marrow out with a popping noise. Then I'd stick my tongue through the circle of bone and wear it for a minute or so before spitting it out on my plate. Parents not impressed.
     
  19. umaeril

    umaeril Guest

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    :lol lmao! That cracked me up. Especially the parents not impressed part. My parents were not impressed either when they tried to make my little brother (aged 6 or 7 at the time) eat his spinich and he threw it up right in front of them. No more spinach for us!
     
  20. The Gov

    The Gov Guest

    Re: .

    I used to hate spinich too. I think it was the texture, it's all slushy and slimy. Now I like it. (in fact I had a big pile of it with the lamb on the day that I ate at home.) It's one of those vegetables you have to grow into, I think.

    The Guardian is running a 'Been There' section on Melbourne. People who've signed up to the site can recommend a place in Melbourne and then other visitors vote on it. What it looks like, though, is that people who run businesses, particularly restaurants, are going in there and using it as an advertising space. "It's the most fantastic classic Italian espresso bar, and the perfect place to spend an hour or so - whether for a coffee at its long sleek bar, or for a bowl of steaming home-made pasta ..." runs the description of one restaurant. I won't name them, not because they're a bad restaurant, but because I don't want to advertise them here as well.

    The idealist in me - and the part that would prefer not to have businesses plugged at her everywhere she looks - doesn't like it.

    The footy entry looks genuine though. "[T]he smallness of the players shorts have to seen to be believed."
     

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