How to listen to classical music?

Discussion in 'Metropolis' started by Crazy Dave Number 23, Mar 7, 2014.


The Gates of Horn and Ivory

Two Gates the silent House of Sleep adorn; Of polish'd Iv'ry this, that of transparent Horn:
True Visions thro' transparent Horn arise; Thro' polish'd Iv'ry pass deluding Lies.

  1. Crazy Dave Number 23

    Crazy Dave Number 23 Methodless Madness Staff Member

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    I have always wanted to listen. I enjoyed the music when I was very young, and that contributed to me taking band classes in school. What I don't know is how people go about listening to it. Sure, I know the names of composers, but they are all dead. At least, the ones I want to start with. So, are all recordings of classical music done by modern symphonic orchestras? Do people choose an orchestra they like best from a certain city? It should all sound the same from any orchestra, due to the instructions of the original composer, right?

    From Amazon, a review on a 170-disc Mozart set:

    It sounds like people can be really opinionated about how these things are performed. I really was not aware that it appears to be such a matter of taste. I guess that is why orchestras are housed in large cities, are expensive to attend, and why it seems like snooty people go to them. Fie!
     
  2. Ithieldin

    Ithieldin Member

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    If you like classical music and your looking for something viable in modern music, try Jazz. I remember a Jazz band I used to listen to in the 90's that was pretty good was called the Yellow Jackets.
     
  3. Umaeril

    Umaeril -o-}}}X{{{-o- Staff Member

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    I do listen to classical, I used to listen to it more a few years back. When I would choose a CD I would make sure the orchestra was a known one. Sometimes you get orchestras from small podunk places and they do not measure up to something from the Met, or St. Martin in the Fields. So you need to choose the producing orchestra carefully. Reviews are good, but also google the orchestra. Same goes for opera, find out who is singing and google them.

    Most recordings are new. I think the newer the better because of better technology. Instead of remastering an old recording it might be better to get something new for the sake of sound quality. Do you need some composer suggestions?
     
  4. Crazy Dave Number 23

    Crazy Dave Number 23 Methodless Madness Staff Member

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    Yes, I do.
     
  5. Umaeril

    Umaeril -o-}}}X{{{-o- Staff Member

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    Classical composers come in all flavors and it depends on what you like.

    If you like solo piano, beautiful dreamy music, then get Chopin's Nocturnes. There is other music by Chopin but I like the nocturnes the best for studying or walking.

    If you like big orchestral music then Beethoven is great, Berlioz, Handel, Mozart, oh so many others.

    Chamber music try Vivaldi. Also Vivaldi's Four Seasons is a classic for orchestral.

    Baroque I would put Bach and Telemann maybe and some others.

    There is also "modern" classical with composers more from the 19th century but it is more atonal and I am not very fond of it.

    This is just off the top of my head. I am leaving out many great composers, too many to recall, if I remember more I'll write them down.
     
  6. Crazy Dave Number 23

    Crazy Dave Number 23 Methodless Madness Staff Member

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    Well, at least maybe I can learn the styles so that I can develop a preference. Thank you.
     

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